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'as sure as god 



made little green apples . . ." 




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Howard levy . 

chuck parker 
ashley angert 
marjie angert 

marvin lessig 



. . . editor-in-chief 

. . associate editor 
. . associate editor 
. . associate editor 

business manager 



Philadelphia college of osteopathic medicine 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



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This yearbook is the record of those ninety souls, known collectively as the Class of 
1968, who chose to relinquish their identities, subdue their passions, delay their maturi- 
ty and, in many ways, divorce themselves from the external world in order to seek that 
Most Noble Title — Physician. There is no denying that total immersion in the subject 
matter was necessary; nor should we feel guilty about time and energy spent in pursuit 
of an adequate education — in classroom and laboratory, in hospitals throughout the city, and in the 
reading of texts and journals. This was required. This was our free choice. Yet in this period of concen- 
trated study we missed much. 

What happened during these four years of confinement? Most of our friends in the "outside world" 
were married, having their first child, and working on their second raise just about the time we were 
making our first big loan and stepping into that greatest of anxiety producers — the anatomy lab. Sep- 
tember of 1964 marked the onset of ten months during which we could do little else but keep up with the 
pace. Few took more than passing note of the fact that Johnson was re-elected president, that Dr. Martin 
Luther King received the Nobel Peace Prize, or that China exploded its first atomic bomb. More impor- 
tant were the arteries, veins, and nerves of the brachial plexus. 

We entered the second year with a much lighter heart and far less anxiety; yet the total commitment 
and high pressured study remained. Some of us actually began to enjoy the study of medicine. At the 
same time, however, we began to recognize and feel personally the "sacrifices" which are inherent in the 
life of both medical student and physician. 

Those who were married found perhaps that their wives were not willing to be cast off" by that ever pre- 
sent mistress — medicine. Fathers became strangers to their children. The many single men of the class 
grudgingly recognized that little energy was left for the pursuit of a mate, let alone good times. Few 
friendships outside of classmates could be maintained, if for no other reason than lack of time. Most of 
us gave up completely any notions of keeping in good physical shape and few maintained an interest in 
the world outside the Cloister. 

For nostalgic reference on looking back over these four years, it might be of interest to enumerate 
some of the more moving events which passed us by, all but unnoticed. In early 1965, President Johnson 
reaffirmed our commitment in Vietnam and the war was "escalated" with the first air attacks on the 
north; U.S. troops were rushed to the Dominican Republic to prevent a communist takeover there; and 
in the summer, an event occurred which shattered the smug security of most Americans. An area in Los 
Angeles called Watts, little known outside of California, was completely devastated by race riots. On the 
other side of the world, Albert Schweitzer passed away, and far above us all, the two astronauts Grissom 
and Young orbited the earth in our first two-man spacecraft. Their televised take-off" was viewed by mil- 



lions. 



The year 1966 was marked by turmoil. The Vietnam "conflict" continued to grow uncontrollably. 
Scanty reports from Red China told of purges of anti-Mao factions. Africa was in ferment: Nkhruma 
was ousted from Ghana, Rhodesia cut ties with Britain, Verwoerd was assassinated in South Africa, and 
7000 Ibo tribesmen were massacred in Nigeria. India was racked by famine and rioting, DeGaul ordered 
NATO out of France, and floods destroyed priceless art works in Florence and Venice. 

In the United States, the term "Black Power" came into being, and more cities were faced with riot- 
ing. In contrast to this destruction, Medicare, over the opposition of the AMA, came into effect, and 
several million senior citizens began reaping its benefits. The fantastic Project Gemini was completed 
when Lovell and Aldrin orbited the earth 59 times, linked up with an Agena rocket, and took the historic 
five hour space walk. 

Nineteen sixty-seven, the 25th year of the atom and many of our 25th birthdays, saw the war in Viet- 
nam brought home to our people. Boys died and parents asked why. Peace marchers vied with civil 
rights demonstrators for headlines. Rioting in the cities was again sporadically repeated; the Israelis 
conducted a successful six-day war against the Arabs; and, as if in response to madness, the Age of Psy- 
chedelia blossomed. Dr. Christian Barnard and his team performed a successful heart transplant in 
South Africa, McNamara quit as Defense Secretary, and Carl Sandburg passed away. 

As we entered our fourth and last year we were able to emerge for a brief glance at our surroundings. 
From our clinic booth or hospital assignment we found ourselves debating political issues and reacting 
emotionally to live war battles on television, to the surprise withdrawal of Johnson from the presidential 
race, and to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The world was once again becoming a real 
place wherein we would have to reside. A potential riot became a personal threat. Many of us were now 
married, buying that new car, having that long-awaited first child, and anticipating paying debts rather 
than incurring them. Not without some trepidation internships were chosen and impatiently awaited. 
With mixed feeling of exuberance over having attained our goal, and awe at the great responsibility in- 
trinsic to our new profession, we prepared to leave the Cloister and enter the world 

All this was before the home and oflnce, the pro-rated income, and the fourteen-hour work day. Very 
likely you. like (jthers before you, will one day ask when time slipped away. Reflecting on it you may 
even pull this dusty and well-traveled pea-green volume from some forgotten shelf. Then, on skimming 
these pages, semblance of an answer may be found. In the end, years from now, these pictures (some 
wanting focus) and words (some wanting objectivity) will recall, not without melancholy, the beginning. 
Hopefully you may be moved in all this retrcjspeetion to chuckle to yourself. 



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the uterus of the woman on the bed contracted 
according to its cellular intelligence, without 
command, the vertical muscles squeezed downward, 
the woman moaned . . . 




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"we are surrounded with fellowmen, beings of 
the same nature, in the same circumstances, 
and having the same wants with ourselves; to 
whom we are therefore in a pecuHar manner 
Hnked and related, and whose happiness and 
misery depend very much on our behavior to 










"to write a prescription 
is easy, but to come to 
an understanding with 
people is hard." 

/ran: kafka 





BBIHI 





"drugs cannot inspire or encourage comfort, 
only a person can heal a person." 

schilling 




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"the general principles of any study 

you may learn by books at home; 

but the detail, the color, the tone, the air, 

the life which makes it live in us, 

you must catch all these from those in whom it lives already.' 

John henry newman 










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"do you know," said a voice in my ear, "i have very little confidence 
in you. why, you were only blown in here, you didn't come on your own feet, 
instead of helping me, you're cramping me on my deathbed, what i'd like 
best is to scratch your eyes out." 

"right" i said, "it is a shame, and yet i am a doctor, what am i 
to do? believe me, it is not too easy for me either." 

franz kafka 



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"i've studied now philosophy, 
and jurisprudence, medicine 
and even, alas, theology 
from end to end with labor keen; 
and here, poor fool; with all my lore 
i stand no wiser than before." 

goethe 




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dr. thomas santucci is, professionally, a pediatrician, since 1942, when many of our class 
members were born, he has been teaching pediatrics at Philadelphia college of osteopathic 
medicine, his course has in that time developed into one of the best organized, most vibrant se- 
ries of lectures we have heard during our entire educational experience. 

however, after that course he is remembered not only as a superior pediatrician and an ex- 
pert mentor, but, more importantly, as a human being, when his thunder abated, in the silent 
moments after class, one might still hear him occasionally pitch into fortissimo to drive the 
point home, cajoling, pushing, and finally confronting us directly, he took the time to make 
sure we knew the theory and practice of pediatrics. 

in the classroom, in the clinics, and with the student's children for 26 years, he has given an 
irreplaceable gift to the public and the profession — himself. 

privately he is yet another man. unsatisfied with the status quo, truly concerned about the 
social and professional ambiguities of our time, he is a man of outstanding courage and convic- 
tion, his frank honesty is buttressed by a straightforward ethic uncompromised by any econom- 
ic, political, or professional ends, one of his favorite quotes by dr. martin luther king says 
"there are no reprisals in matters of principle." although he may sometimes stand alone, he 
remains admiringly adamant. 

it is with warm remembrance we dedicate this book to tom santucci. more than a pediatri- 
cian, more than a physician, he is a man. 





frederic h. barth, b.s., d.sc, 1 1 .d. 
president 



Sherwood r. mercer, a.b., m.a., 1 1 .d. 
vice president and dean 





thomas m. rowland, jr., b.s., 
director of admissions, registrar 



paul h. thomas, b.s., d.o., ph.d. 
associate dean and 
coordinator oj research 





mr. harold j. king 



miss carol fox 





mr. John de angelis 




mrs. marguerite archer 



miss paula catrambone 





mrs. martha cain 



miss nancy modesta 



mr. James wolf 





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anatomy 





edwin h. cressman, d.o. 



blanche clow alien, d.o. 



lewis g. torrieri, d.o. 




Vincent t. cipolla, d.o. 




lemar f. eisenhut, d.o. 



robert w. england, d.o. 





Herbert carr, d.o. 




Bernard witlin, d.sc. 



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microbiology 

and 
public health 





:??n'ssrasawi 



physiological chemistry 




albert p. kline, ph.d. 




carl g. krech 




nikolai lobunez 






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paul h. thomas, d.o., ph.d. 



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spencer g. bradford, d.o. 
nicholas m. renzi, d.o. 



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physiology 

and 

pharmacology 



frank b. falbey, d.o. 





normun b. richlcr, d.o. 




morton greenwald, d.o. 




justice h. James, d.o. 



pathology 



ruth V. e. waddel, d.o. 




Bealb 




edwin h. cressman, d.o. 



dermatology 



waiter 1. willis, d.o. 



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i.sracl fcldman, d.o. 




William s. spaeth, d.o. 



«5§r>i,-- — 1 





thomas f. santucci, d.o. 



pediatrics 



57 





george h. guest, d.o. 




morton s. herskowitz, d.o. 





neurology and 
psychiatry 



i. j. oberman, d.o. 



Cecil Harris, d.o. 
martin b. goldstein, d.o. 





anesthesiology 




thomas 1. moy, d.o. charles a. hemmer. d.o. 




anthony s. jannelli, d.o. 



edward d. white, d.o. 




wilmer h. bath, d.o. 




yilJil ' Mi^i 



radiology 




robcrt 1. meals, d.o. 



paul t. lloyd, d.o. 





johnj. gilligan, d.o. 



a. aline swift, d.o. 




j. peter tilley, d.o. 




gerald scharf, d.o. 



internal 
medicine 




albert f. d'alonzo, d.o. 



andrew a. pecora, d.o. 



William f. daiber, d.o. 





»■■ 





galen s. young, d.o. 



harry e. binder, d.o. 



surgery 



henry a. d'alonzo, d.o. 






nicholasc. eni, d.o. 





carlton street, d.o. 
nicholas pedano, d.o. 






anthony p. del borello, d.o. 

raymond 1. ruberg, d.o. 



herman kohn, d.o. 



dominie j. salerno, d.o. 





herman e. poppe, d.o. 



arnoid gerber, d.o. 





W" ~> 



John j. fleitz, d.o. 





Charles I carr, d o 




wilHam e. brigha, d.o. 



surgery 



nicholas d. tretta, d.o. 
leonard finkelstein, d.o 



robert a. whinney, d.o. 



h.w. sterrett, d.o. 





milton 1. bluitt, d.o. 




robert a. austin, d.o. 



interns 




and 



residents 



lynn f. sumerson, d.o. 



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galen d. young, d.o. 





,samuel 1. caruso. d.o. 




anne jendryk, d.o. 
albert grayce, d.o. 



clinic 



Joseph 1. hayes, d.o. 




eleanor v. masterson, d.o. 



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supervisors 



James f. conroy, d.o. 




William h. landgrebe, d.o. 





maurice rosman. d.o. 




william s. spaeth, d.o. 



r. munro purse, d.o. 






Joseph c. minniti, d.o. 



f'iJ^, 









mrs. hattie peed 
mrs. betty selby 
miss debbie fauntleroy 



house 
physicians 

leonard frontin, d.o. 




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the freshmen 

w. novelli chairman 

b. michalak . secretary 

e. felski treasurer 



dr. g. guest 

d. parrillo 

g. devonshire 

1. ewing 

1. feldman 

w. haug 

b. michalak 

d. ockrymiek 

i. wertheimer 





dr. h. da\ 
dr. !. mm 



r. cohen 
f. foschetti 
j. gooding 



j. lo monaco 
r. manceri 
d. robbins 



h, sacher 
a. sandman 
g. Weinberger 




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g. atwell 


a. licrshfeld 


n. basso 


h. klcinbcrg 


j. Covington 


l.klinc 


m. d;ilscy 


a, krcmcr 


l.dalton 


c. Icadcrman 




g. hamstra 



j. Sheridan 
j. simelaro 



g. packin 



g. dainoff 



j. yardumian 



dr. r. england 
mrs. n. ackerman 



n. brandoff 



r, campanile 



e. czarnetzky 
p. de tnuro 






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d. brown 


b. eisenberg 


r. matsko 


m. Cunningham 


k. krat/^er 


j. nipple 


d. de putron 


p. kupperstein 


g. papp 


j. dougherty 


r. larkins 


c. schultz 



w. novelli 
b. siotkin 
s. Strauss 
e. zebooker 



r. bogerson 
r. brookman 
p. eatough 
m. fishtein 



p. flynn 




r. iuber 


d. sesso 


m. o'gara 


r. tecau 


s. schwartzberg 


r. terranova 




the sophomores 

j. nicholson chairman 

d. goldberg vice-chairman 

m. gottlieb secretary 

c. podder treasurer 




d. brzusek 


b. Cunningham 


b. butta 


t. devlin 


m. chaffier 


j.ellis 




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j. dieterle 
b. gillillun 
d. goldberg 
j. nicholson 



e. sullivan 



|. wasniewski 



in^if^wi|S 




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I. bookman 



j. becher 





II 



V. flagiello 



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CLINICS 

PHItAOElPHWCOllECEOfOSIfOfATHrl 
OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT^! 

9am, I) 5pm 
NEW REGISTRATIONS 

Children ■■ \fx<4ay £iJhufi-Uj If 






j. fireman 




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c. kaczey, e. spoil, r. stremmel, m. tieff, j. walli: 



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e. lisk 


a, mollen 


f. newman 


r. meltz 


r. motsay 


h. palat 




j. miller 


h. murtilf 


1. papa 






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the juniors 

w. barrett chairman 

p. varner vice-chairman 

c. cage secretary 

j. giuliano treasurer 





r. abraham, d. ahner, r. alexander, h. bacon, e. balkovec, r. barnes, w. barnhurst. s. bernstein, h. holloway 



iM I Mlli,yWIII I IMMIW I 



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j. cady, a. cage, f. cole, w. connolly, s. craig, b. eisen- 
hardt, a. fanelli 








c. sicbold, r. simmers, li, slalil, w, Stanford, oil J. lucas 




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i. kernis, a. koff, h. koser, I. kruzel, s. kushner, d. larusso, j. levin 





j. banks 



j. borl/ 



(I, bcvan b. bronc/yk 

95 
a. biczak j. bruno 

j. bocckcr 






fraternities and organizations 




atlas 



s. markunas president 

r. smith vice-president 

k. weiss secretary 

b. butta treasurer 



iota tau sigma 




a. biczak president 

c. cage vice-president 

b. eisenhardt secretary 

m. tieff treasurer 



lambda omicron gamma 




p. wallner president 

j. levin vice-president 

s. levin secretary 

d. kiner treasurer 



mm,m,,mmmm«m,ma-m,m<ammmnmriimKi)\Kmmm 



phi sigma gamma 




w. Connolly president 

d. brzusek vice-president 

g. buonincontro secretary 

g. bradley treasurer 



delta omega 




s. rex president 

s. craig vice-president 

c. podder secretary 

m. toll treasurer 



students wives 




^ 





b. hershey president 

m. gula 1st vice-president 

d. limongelli 2nd vice-president 

n. kime recording secy. 

j. jama corresponding secy. 

n. alexander treasurer 




-.^■^■'A.'- 





^. 




student council 




d. gula president 

s. levin vice-president 

d. izzi secretary 

c. giombetti treasurer 





repre 


sentatives 


seniors 




sophomores 


g. hershey 
s. levin 
d. massey 
1. rondini 




j. dieterle 
b. gilfillan 

d. goldberg 

e. Sullivan 


w. smiley 




j. wasniewski 


juniors 




freshmen 


a. biczak 

c. cage 
j.giuliano 

d. izzi 

m. radbill 




e. felski 
j. gooding 
V. gregory 
p. pantle 
b. slotkin 



smmMB^mssm 







internal medicine society 



j. giudice president 




neuropsychiatric society 

a. angert president 



undergraduate academy 
of applied osteopathy 





catholic guild 



s. wood president 



g. buonincontro 
li ^' 



christian osteopathic society 

president 





seniors 



reflections on a poll 



The final portion of this record is to present and display the seniors. Past books have relied heavily on the accumulation of 
formal postures to preserve that round portion of a man above his shoulders and display it on a flat page. To many of our men 
8 X 10 glossies will be sufficient, for it is true that Section A knows few of Section B, and it is doubtful that 62 really knows 63, 
After four years some still ask for the guy's name that sits next to so-and-so. 

So diverse and yet so uncannily similar are these seniors, however, that we think their roundness should be exploited to his- 
toric advantage. A personal presentation rather than a passing display should, we think, be included herein. 

Question: How does one gather such a personal glimpse of this mosaic group? 

Choose one: A) Submit personal histories. 

B) Offer hackneyed predjudicial generalities. 

C) Take a poll; then make generalities with an attempt at objectivity. 

Correct choice: (C). The poll in modern society has become a valid source for generalities about any group. 

Ironically, the unsigned poll was taken on the day our class postured for the camera. Not so ironic were the furtive glances 
that betrayed the lesson our class learned well the last four years: Don't count on graduation. A striking lack of confidence is 
present in these seniors. Some explanation is offered by the observation that, when asked specifically about the general in- 
structional philosophy of PCOM, only four people of the 88 who took the poll answered "respect-motivation." Four others 
abstained. All the rest, a striking 91% answered "fear-harrassment." This modality of training has no place in grade school, 
and certainly should not be present at a graduate level. A blatant example of this philosophy is the secret subjectivity of the 
credit-grading and dismissal system. 

This may seem a harsh introduction to this rounding report, but more lesions plague the posture. On March 18, 1968, the 
student body was abruptly notified that "unless you are on duty in the Barth Pavilion at City Line, you have no business in 
this area. The same rule applies to the 48th Street Hospital ..." Oddly enough, the questionaire indicated that a full 69% of 
our seniors had moonlighted at other hospitals — 42 in osteopathic hospitals, 31 in allopathic hospitals, and 13 in both types 
— all of which is, again, "against the rules." One may be justifiably proud that so many responsibly sought further medical 
experience. Medicolegal and administrative reasons for these restrictions have somehow been circumvented by midwestern 
osteopathic colleges which diversify the experience of their student bodies by excellent externships throughout the Philadel- 
phia area. Howsomever, other paradoxical juxtapositions occur in principles and practice. In a broader view, the very founda- 
tions of the profession are in a state of compromise. TheO in PCOM makes our school and four other graduate medical insti- 
tutions different. According to the poll, 40% of our seniors did not indend to enter residency training, and presumably will 
become general practitioners. A note of optimism is struck in this age of increasing specialization and depersonalization in 
medicine. However, only 45% of the 88 asked intend to use osteopathic manipulative therapy as a routine part of their prac- 
tice. Something has happened to the O. 

Further compromise in the O was demonstrated when the poll showed that 64 of the 88 answering failed a total of 174 
courses in 3 years. That's quite a good record considering that we took 70 courses during our junior year alone. But of these 
174 failures, 44% occurred in osteopathic principles and practice and applied anatomy. By actual count in the catalog these 
courses fill only 10% of the total didactic hours. 

Many may not be interested in the percentage of graduates using manipulation or the disproportionate number of failures 
in osteopathic courses, but all will be concerned with yet another disclosure. While few practicing osteopathic physicians 
would consider a union with the allopaths, our poll revealed that 60% of our graduating seniors when asked, "would you vote 
for a merger with the MD's (on an equal opportunity basis)" voted yes; 6% abstained. Such is the depth of the animosity en- 
gendered by the PCOM experience. The O is in trouble. 

To what purpose are these facts presented? To undermine the profession . . .? To strike out irrationally and "get even" . . .? 
On the contrary, symptoms — facts — are a means to diagnose and correct the lesion. Together these facts mean something; 
as single entities they could be misleading. 



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Together they say that something is different at PCOM, different from all other osteopathic institutions. But where is the 
lesion? What makes PCOM so different? Why is it a covert fact throughout the profession that most PCOM students are so 
defensive and disgruntled a lot? Where in the soma and psyche of PCOM is the lesion that drives excellent instructors away 
and defies any critical examination? 

Biopsy of the soma reveals no pathology. The new hospital has itself forced some changes in curriculum and concentration. 
The pathology rests in the psyche — not demonstrated on slides, not visualized at conventions, but lived in the "PCOM fami- 

ly". 

The education of a physician today should involve more than the harassing accumulation of facts. Osteopathic philosophy 
provides that the student, as a human being, should be appreciated as a total man by his osteopathic exemplars and his osteo- 
pathic (?) administration. In the family, however, discipline is meted out arbitrarily. Guarded by a pass-fail system in which 
the students don't see their errors, parents can move fluidly and subjectively impose their own values without explanation. As 
in high school, students can suffer the humiliation of being perfunctorily jerked from classes for a mere haircut. More impor- 
tant than the fact that this occurred is the fact that the faculty permitted this tactic. The only objection came from the city 
news media. 

It is ironic, moreover, that the greatest emphasis in hospital work during the senior year is not teaching, but is in requiring 
students to perform duties which are relegated to nursing personnel in other hospitals. 

Most important is the attitude of some faculty toward osteopathy. Questions concerning osteopathic principles are fre- 
quently answered in a chiding or dogmatic manner. Students who obviously have interest and ability in osteopathic courses 
are often failed because they "question too much" or have the "wrong attitude." Moreover, many faculty expect the student 
to show unusual responsibility in hospital manipulative therapy, but do little themselves. There is an obvious dichotomy be- 
tween what is taught and what is practiced. 

Sad and apathetic after 20 years of opaque classrooms and thousands of dollars expense, the student is justified in his con- 
sternation. Who knows the student's plight better than the student? Who listens to the student's plight other than the students 
themselves? As in other neurotic contemporary families, little real communication is present. 

The PCOM policy makers are undoubtedly concerned about their school and the profession. But where is concern for the 
students? And where is concern for those excellent instructors who no longer honor the faculty. Students, interns, residents, 
and faculty are all treated as dispensible commodities. Student criticism of a faculty member is unheard of, but those policy 
makers who understand nothing of the rapport in a classroom criticize and rebuke faculty on paltry second-hand knowledge. 
They have excuses for these paradoxes; all the excuses are no excuses. 

In undergraduate school we were dubbed the "future of America." Here, at PCOM, we are "the future of the profession." 
In direct contrast to such hackneyed gossamer visions of the future, we see ourselves in the present. We are PCOM and the 
reason for its existence. We are the now of the profession — what is actually happening to the principles and practice — and 
as such deserve a role in the decisions which will determine its future. 

The real difficulty is in the next logical step - finding a meaningful role for the student. The Curriculum Committee of the 
Student Council has been meeting with the administration, and their efforts to effect changes are appreciated. Yet, ironically, 
many of the faculty members who see the need for change say nothing — apparently due to their "healthy respect" of the 
omnipotent PCOM powers. This, then, is a plea on behalf of the students for greater dialogue and understanding. 

No poll is required, in the final analysis, to report that our graduates recognize thai all staff members are not the same. The 
opinions and facts shared herein are well understood by many of the men who contribute to the college. It is these interested 
faculty and staff that will help mold the today of PCOM. Hopefully, these men, our own class, and the remaining students 
will be encouraged to continue to vie for reasonable re-examination and responsible change. Together we can make osteo- 
pathic education at PCOM what osteopathic philosophy already is to many of the American public concern for the total 
man. 







CONKOKKEillH Of PENIIS»LV«NIJ 
OEPABIUEUr Of PUOtIt «EIF«RE ^m 

EMBREEVILIE 




AHOSPITAL 






candids 





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!"S!?3!RJ^f. 



CLINICS 

PHILADtlPHlA CollEGt OF OsUOPWHt 
OUT PATIENT DEPART/V\ENT 



9i M • 5pm 
NEW REGISTRATIONS 



s 




'TwmwwmsTwssssm^. 









at the base of the pyramid of 
medical knowledge lies anatomy. 




'they say city line may open soon." 
'that's what they said when we had skin." 




IIHnillHIIMIItHllllMnimiWKIIIIimmirg ■■iiiiji..imhiiiit 




at left, 

the mystery prosector 



^5 describes a sacral base. 








dr. angusg. cathie 

demonstrates 

the use of his trigger li nger 

to a haughty freshman. 



■uimuiwminni^l^lllUfmiHm; 




"basically, 
ac-actually, 
by and large 




'howsomever, stress in this region is transmitted up just a bit. 









Pi, 




/ MF^^ii: 



t 



G 



w 







through 

the 

years 







/^ 





"i've beaten bigger guys than you with one hand be- 
hind my back." 





'he got you in applied." 




the chief wishes the group well. 



volunteer member 
evergreen 



conservation club 




in april of 1967 our consciences 
were awakened by the cry for help 
from the citizens of a va Ion to aid 
the oil-slicked ducks that were 
unable to keep afloat. 




for normal, emotional development, the bottle should not be taken from the 
child prematurely. 




V. paul deftly 
shifts into 
second gear. 




"ob is so busy, i don't even 
have time to eat." 



"what do you mean i'm 
breaking sterility?" 




lederle trip 




the junior class 
takes a holiday 





. . . two days of food and drink 
and drink and food. 






graduates 




ashleyjoel angert, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

la salle college, a.b. 
university of Pennsylvania 



grandview hospital 
dayton, ohio 




marjorie angert, d.o. 

Warrington, Pennsylvania 

university ol'michigan 
university oraix-marsuillcs 



grandview hospital 
dayton, ohio 




alan lewis anthony, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

drexel institute of technology, b.s. 

parkview hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




george n. amimo apondo 

kisumu, kenya 
elizabethtown college, b.s. 



bay view hospital 
bay village, ohio 




ronald e. ayres, d.o. 

burgettslown, Pennsylvania 

eastern nazarene college, a.b. 

grandview hospital 
dayton, ohio 




t.fred bear, d.o. 

broomall, Pennsylvania 

temple university school of pharmacy, b.s. 
temple university 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 





James lawrence beck, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

lebanon valley college, a.b. 

grandivew hospital 
dayton, ohio 



volker paul bertrand, d.o. 

midvale, new jersey 

long island university, b.s. 

tucson general hospital 
tucson, arizona 





amanda talmadge blount, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

mercy-douglass hospital school of nursing, r.n. 
temple university 



delaware valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 



elizabeth hermione bomheuer, d.o. 

recklinghausen, west germany 

duquesne university, b.s. 

riverview osteopathic hospital 
norristown, Pennsylvania 




david o. boyer, d.o. 

hellertown, Pennsylvania 

moravian college, b.s. 

allentown osteopathic hospital 
allentown, Pennsylvania 




george I. brad ley, d.o. 

Woodbury, new jersey 

rutgers university, a.b. 

lancaster osteopathic hospital 
lancaster, Pennsylvania 




lewis jay brandt, d.o. 

elkins park, Pennsylvania 

temple university school of pharnnacy 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




ftoyd w. car son, jr., d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

morgan stale college, b.s. 

delavi'are valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 




Patrick r. cavanaugh, d.o. 

pipersville, Pennsylvania 

la salle college 

green cross general hospital 
Cuyahoga falls, ohio 




Vincent a. ciambotti, d.o. 

new castle, Pennsylvania 

youngstown university, a.b. 

brentwood hospital 
Cleveland, ohio 



N 




a. kenneth ciongoli, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

universila di firenze 
university of Pennsylvania, a.b. 

dclroil oslcopalhic hospital 
detroil, michigan 




j. paul clymer, d.o. 

quarryville, Pennsylvania 

eastern mennonite college, b.s. 

lancaster osteopathic hospital 
lancaster, Pennsylvania 



J 





Steven r. cohen, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

temple university, a.b. 

martin place hospitals 

madison heights, michigan 



hugh h. corddry, d.o. 

montclair, new jersey 

brown university 
temple university 



detroit osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 





ivan a. doner, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

temple university, a.b. 

parkview hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



gerald edelstein, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania state university, a.b. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




Joseph k. eshleman, d.o. 

wellsville, Pennsylvania 

elizabethtown college, b.s. 

memorial osteopathic hospital 
york, Pennsylvania 




frederic h.ferguson, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

drexel institute of technology, b.s. 

Oklahoma osteopathic hospital 
tulsa, Oklahoma 



HaMTh 




lawrence a. foster, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

drexel institute of technology, b.s. 

cherry hill hospital 
cherry hill, new jersey 




bernard j.jox,jr., d.o. 

Wilmington, deluware 

saint Joseph's college, b.s. 

grandview hospital 
dayton, ohio 




m.jane gelnett, d.o. 

millerstown, Pennsylvania 

Susquehanna university, a.b. 

sun coast osteopathic hospital 
largo, florida 




James c. giudice, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

lafayette college, a.b. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




richard I. go r don, d.o. 

wildwood, new jersey 

american university, b.s. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




c. Samuel grove, d.o. 

mount joy, Pennsylvania 

elizabethtown college, b.s. 

lancaster osteopathic hospital 
lancaster, Pennsylvania 



IMJaHMil ! 





duff I. gula, d.o. 

youngstown, ohio 

de pauw university, a.b. 
Ohio state university 



grandview hospital 
dayton, ohio 



James I. harris, d.o. 

mount airy, north Carolina 

guilford college, b.s. 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 






Wl 


SI 


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1. 


J 




Joseph c. hatch, jr., d.o. 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

gettysburg college, a.b. 

martin place hospitals 
madison heights, michigan 



lloyd george hers hey, d.o. 

warren, arizona 

arizona state university, a.b. 

Oklahoma osteopathic hospital 
lulsa, Oklahoma 




Sheldon philip kerner, d.o. 

margate, new jersey 

temple university, a.b. 

doctors hospital 
Columbus, Ohio 




Joseph kessler, d.o. 

forest hills, new york 

new york university, b.s. 

zieger-botsford hospitals 
farmington, michigan 




h. I. kime, d.o. 

longmont, Colorado 

asbury college, a.b. 
university of kentucky, m.a, 

Oklahoma osteopathic hospital 
tulsa, Oklahoma 




david h. kiner, d.o. 

philudclphi;!, Pennsylvania 

temple university, a.b. 

parkview hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




george edward kleiber, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

albright college, b.s. 

zieger-botsford hospitals 
farmington, michigan 




Judith e. kline, d.o. 

allentown, Pennsylvania 

Philadelphia college of pharmacy and 
science, b.s. 



sun coast osteopathic hospital 
largo, florida 







norman m. kopman, d.o. 

Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 

sainl Joseph's college, b.s. 

martin place hospitals 

madison heights, michigan 




preston c. kuptsow, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

university of Pennsylvania, a.b. 

parkview hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



IffliBi 





louis lang. III, d.o. 

narberth, Pennsylvania 

la salle college 

sun coast osteopathic hospital 
largo, florida 



marie elisabeth lang, d.o. 

narberth, Pennsylvania 

chestnut hill college, b.s. 

sun coast osteopathic hospital 
largo, florida 



pill I w ii 





norman a. leopold, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania slate university, b.s. 

detroil osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 



marvin a. lessig, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

university of Pennsylvania, a.b. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




Stephen s. levin, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

temple university 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




Howard r. levy, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

temple university, a.b. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




leonard vito limongelli, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

villanova university, b.s. 

delaware valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 




Samuel dougherty looker, d.o. 

harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

(rank lin and marshall college, a.b, 

community general osteopathic hospital 
harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



SfflHMBHfHl 




jeffery w. loux, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

temple university 

delaware valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 




William j. mc grath, d.o. 

collingswood, new jersey 

saint Joseph's college, b.s. 

memorial osteopathic hospital 
york, Pennsylvania 



raOAIj 




James e. mc hugh, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

la sallc college, a.b. 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




charlesj. makowski, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

la salle college, a.b. 

delaware valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 




thomas mar ko ski, d.o. 

camden, new jersey 

temple university, a.b. 

brentwood hospital 
Cleveland, ohio 




donaldf. masse y, d.o. 

Strafford, Pennsylvania 

villanova university, a.b. 

green cross general hospital 
Cuyahoga falls, ohio 



ggggggm^^myi 







Charles a. mauriello, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
saint Joseph's college, b.s. 



metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 




noel I. melhorn, d.o. 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

university of Pittsburgh, b.s. 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




carl mogil, d.o. 

elkins park, Pennsylvania 

temple university, b.s. 

cherry hill hospital 
cherry hill, new jersey 




arthurj. muller, d.o. 

new york city, new york 

saint John's university, b.s. 

memorial osteopathic hospital 
york, Pennsylvania 




marvinj. nicholas, d.o. 

new york city, new york 

brook lyn college 

city college of new york, b.m.e. 

doctors hospital 
Columbus, Ohio 




Joel e. noel, d.o. 

york, Pennsylvania 

york junior college, a.s. 
lebanon valley college 

memorial osteopathic hospital 
york, Pennsylvania 




harry oeller, jr., d.o. 

Washington crossing, Pennsylvania 

trenton junior college 
delaware valley college 

delaware valley hospital 
bristol, Pennsylvania 




Charles e. parkerjr., d.o. 



saint louis, missoun 



Westminster college, a.b. 

grand rapids osteopathic hospital 
grand rapids, michigan 




leo parties, d.o. 

pennsauken, new jersey 

city college of new york , b.e.e., b.m .e. 
drexcl institute of technology, m.s.e.e. 




davidb. plone, d.o. 

delanco, new jersey 

university of Pennsylvania 

doctors hospital 
Columbus, ohio 



allenlown osteopathic hospital 
allentown, Pennsylvania 




alfredj.poggi,d.o. 

new york city, new york 

saint John's university, b.s. 

memorial osteopathic hospital 
york, Pennsylvania 




martin polnerow, d.o. 

cherry hill, new jersey 

rutgers university, a.b. 

cherry hill hospital 
cherry hill, new jersey 





lynn h. possinger, d.o. 

ridgway, Pennsylvania 

belhany college, b.s. 

tri-counly hospital 

Springfield, Pennsylvania 



John h. rieckers, d.o. 

bloomfield, new jersey 

fairleigh dickinson university, b.s. 

memorial general hospital 
union, new jersey 




louis I. rondini, d.o. 

havertown, Pennsylvania 

saint Joseph's college, a.b. 

detroit osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 




a. ronald rook, d.o. 

broomall, Pennsylvania 

saint Joseph's college, b.s. 

detroit osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 




harry j. rosen, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
la salle college, a.b. 

allentown osteopathic hospital 
allentown, Pennsylvania 




willard dale ruth, d.o. 

chalfont, Pennsylvania 

goshcn college, a.b. 

garden city hospital 
garden city, michigan 



mammmamma 




Seymour b. schiowitz, d.o. 

brooklyn, new york 

brooklyn college 

interboro general hospital 
brooklyn, new york 




John frauds schmelzer, d.o. 

pennsauken, new jersey 

la salle college, a.b. 

cherry hill hospital 
cherry hill, new jersey 




John david sellers, d.o. 

altoona, Pennsylvania 

franklin and marshail college, a.b. 

ziegcr-botsford hospitals 
farmington, michigan 




James preston shinnick, d.o. 

oaklyn, new jersey 

ursinus college, b.s. 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 





William h. smiley. III, d.o. 

havertown, Pennsylvania 

saint Joseph's college, b.s. 

detroit osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 



bernard s. sobel, d.o. 

bristol, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania state university, b.s. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 





James n. Stengel, d.o. 

reading. Pennsylvania 

Colgate university, a.b. 

riverview osteopathic hospital 
norristown, Pennsylvania 



frank t. strattonjr., d.o. 

wyncote, Pennsylvania 

ursinus college, b.s. 

riverview osteopathic hospital 
norristown, Pennsylvania 




Jacques I. surer, jr., d.o. 

havertown, Pennsylvania 

wheaton college, b.s. 

detroit osteopathic hospital 
detroit, michigan 




elliottj. turetzky, d.o. 

monticello, new york 

university of Pennsylvania, b.s. 

interboro general hospital 
brooklyn, new york 



»«^ 




paul elliot wallner, d.o. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

saint Joseph's college, b.s. 

metropolitan hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




James i. Weinberg, d.o. 

bala-cynwyd, Pennsylvania 

temple university, u.b. 

tri-counly hospital 

springlicid, Pennsylvania 




jejfry allan weisfeld, d.o. 

miami beach, florida 

temple university, a.b. 

zieger-botsford hospitals 
farmington, michigan 




haig yardumian, d.o. 

drexel hill, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania military college, b.s. 

tri-county hospital 

Springfield, Pennsylvania 




not pictured, by request: 

earl r. trieveljr., d.o. 

douglassville, Pennsylvania 

albright college, b.s. 

hospitals of Philadelphia college of 
osteopathic medicine 
philadephia, Pennsylvania 



Stephen}, zukowski, d.o. 

westfield, new jersey 

mount saint mary's college, b.s. 

south bend osteopathic hospital 
south bend, Indiana 



family album 





noel and eileen melhorn 



jim and mary ann Stengel 





John and beverly rieckers and family 



ted and Joyce bear and family 





george 

and 

beverly 

kleiber 




jim and dolly mc hugh 




harry and 
marge rcjscn 





John and mary schmelzer and family 



bernie and eslher sobel 



ash and marje angert 




jack and lois surer and family 



al and bctty poggi 




sam and lynda looker 



len and 

diana 

limongelli 

and 

family 




joe and bette kessler and family 





Steve and jane zukowski and family 



awards to seniors — 1968 



the dean' s award 

duff 1. gula 
martin polnerow 



the alumni association award 
Samuel d. looker 
honorable mention: 
Joseph k. eshleman 
James p. shinnick 



the public health award 
marvin a. lessig 



the alice snyder barth memorial award 
lewis j. brandt 



the dorothy jean sivitz, d.o., memorial award 
arthur j. muUer 
John d. sellers 
jeffry a. weisfeld 



the John h. eimerbrink, d.o., memorial award 
earl r. trievel, jr. 



the harold I. bruner, d.o., memorial award 
martin polnerow 



the wilbur p. lutz. d.o., memorial award 
joel e. noel 
honorable mention: 
Joseph c. hatch, jr. 

the obstetrical award 

leonard v. limongelli 



the frederic h. barth award 
bernard j. fox, jr. 



the homer mackey memorial award 
Samuel d. looker 



mosby book awards 

James 1. beck 
william h. smiley 



students' wives book award 
samuel d. looker 



the belle h. and arthur m. flack memorial award 
samuel d. looker 
honorable mention: 
James 1. beck 
Joseph c. hatch, jr. 



borden undergraduate research award 
william h. smiley 



the harold c. waddel, d.o.. memorial award 
Joseph kessler 
honorable mention: 
david b. plone 



graduation 

June 9, 1968 





"time it was, 

and what a time it was, 

it was . . . 

a time of innocence, 

a time of confidences. 

long ago ... it must be . . . 

i have a photograph. 

preserve your memories; 

they're all that's left you." 



paul .simon 










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Howard levy editor-in-chief 

chuck parker associate editor 

ashley angert associate editor 

marjie angert associate editor 

marvin lessig business manager 

Charles mauriello business staff 

haig yardumian photographer 

ashley angert photographer 



on behalf of the staff of synapsis 1968, i would 
like to extend my sincere thanks to the following 
people for their help in compihng this yearbook: 

terry mc go vern and the am eri can yearbook 

company 

zamsky studios and its entire staff 

Steve toparov, photographer 

and my family, for its patience and self-control 

during the months when halfofthe house was 

taken up with yearbook material. 




howie levy 



SPONSORS 



The Class of 1968 wishes to express their sincere appreciation to the Sponsors listed below for their sup- 
port of SYNAPSIS 1968. 



Dr. Thomas F. Santucci 

Dr. Rachel Witmyer 

Dr. Raymond G. Israel 

Dr. W.L. Stoker 

Dr. Morton Herskowitz 

Dr. and Mrs. James Frazer 

Dean Sherwood R. Mercer 

Dr. Adele M. Antry 

Dr. D.G. Hunter 

Dr. Anita H. Atkins 

Dr. George Guest 

Dr. W.M.Show 

Dr. Robert C.Greer, III 

Dr. Paul W. Weiss 

Dr. Edwin H. Cressman 

Dr. Arthur Koenigsberg 

Dr. Russel N. Eberly 

Dr. Herman Poppe 

Dr. Martin Weber 

Dr. Louisa B. Smith 

Dr. Harriet Parker 

Dr. Sidney Snyder 

Dr. Benjamin Schreiber 

Dr. Mortimer J. Sullivan 

Dr. Bernard J. Plone 

Dr. R.W. Teague 

Dr. Mario L. Salamone 

Dr. Arnold Gerber 

Dr. WiUiam F. Daiber 

Dr. Mary Hiller Leiby 

Dr. W. Roland Disinger 

Dr. Samuel L. Caruso 

Dr. Raymond J. Saloom 

Dr. Nelson Jones 

Dr. Jon H.Sally 

Mr. Thomas M. Rowland, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul H. Thomas 

Dr. Marvin E, Sultz 

Dr. Alfred B. Hess 

Dr. James J. Davis 

Dr. H. Mahlon Gehman 

Dr. J. Craig Walsh 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Weaver 

Dr. Howard A. Sealone 

Dr. Sevilla Mullet 

Dr. C. Edwin Long 

Dr. Joseph Shankin 

Dr. and Mrs. Kirk Hilliard, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Warren H. Swenson 

Dr. and Mrs. George B. Stineman 

Dr. Edith J. Hunter 

Dr. Joseph J. Azelvandre 



Dr. William A. Jeffrey 

Dr. Robert A. Whinney 

Dr. John A. Whyte 

Dr. Elmer S. Carll 

Dr. J.K. Miller 

Dr. F.M. Purse 

Dr. S.Paul Sadick 

Dr. Morton Greenwald 

Dr. John J. Lalli 

Dr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Mauer 

Dr. E.L.Woods 

Dr. and Mrs. Philip M. Lessig 

Dr. Herman Kohn 

Dr. Alan Snider 

Dr. David Heilig 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Ernest Leuzinger 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Mazerski 

Dr. Michael J. Holt, Jr. 

Dr.H.WillardSterrett, Jr. 

Dr. Harry I. Stein 

Dr. Seymour Schlossberg 

Dr. Hartley R. Steinsnyder 

Dr. Leonard H. Finkelstein 

Dr. George S. Rothmeyer 

Dr. Leonard J. Kirschbaum 

Dr. Melvin M. Glaser 

Dr. George J. Slotoroff 

Dr. Edward A. Tibbeiis 

Dr. Leo Romisher 

Dr. James E. Galliher 

Dr. Albert S. Lipson 

Dr. and Mrs. John J. Gilligan 

Dr. Lois Goorley Wood 

Dr. Charles Steiner 

Dr. H.Walter Evans 

Dr. Harry Elston, Jr. 

Dr. R. Raymond Kuptsow 

Dr. Sidney Kochman 

Dr. Joseph E. Kunkle 

Mr. Samuel A. Blank 

Dr. Bernard Amster 

Dr. Stanley Dorman 

Dr. Norman B. Richter 

Dr. Kenneth C. Gearhart 

Dr. Morton Terry 

Dr. Walter A. McCool 

Dr. Richard D. Hockstein 

Dr. Anthony S. Ciminera 

Dr. Francis X. Belz 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas C. Pedano 

Dr. Robert England 

Dr. A. Aline Swift 



i«ii 



SPONSORS 



Dr. J.V. Koehler 

Dr. C. P. Dickerman 

Dr. J. Brendan Wynne 

Dr. David Silverman 

Dr. Albert Bonier 

Dr. and Mrs. Q.R, Flickinger 

Dr. John J. Fleitz 

Dr. Clarence Baldwin 

Dr. Simon M. Lubin 

Dr. W.C. Flanders 

Dr. Charles W. Snyder, Jr. 

Dr. J. Marshall Hoag 

Dr. Jules Cohen 

Dr. Elliot B. Port 

Dr. Joseph A. Walsh, Jr. 

Dr. Foster C. True 

Dr. William G. Morris 

Dr. Daniel G. Zarowitz 

Dr. Henry A. Sawyer 

Dr. John A. Fidler 

Hon. and Mrs. John Morgan Davis 

Dr. N.S.Nicholas 

Dr. Henry A. D"Alonzo 

Quakertown Osteopathic Clinic 

Dr. Raymond L. Ruberg 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl H. Gedney 



Dr. Harry W. Breitman 

Dr. Michael F. Avallone 

Dr. Roderick C. Cannatella 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Wescott 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry B. Davis 

Dr. Irvin J. Angert 

Dr. Albert J. Fornace 

Dr. RuthV.E. Waddel 

Dr. Wesley V. Boudette 

Dr. George D. Marvil, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas Eni 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert F. D"Alonzo 

Miss Frances Schoppy 

Dr. Carlton Street 

Dr. Anthony Del Boreilo 

Dr. Morris Kramer 

Dr. Daniel Belsky 

Dr. Arthur M. Flack, Jr. 

Mrs. Esther L. Campanell 

Mr. David G. Morse 

Mr. and Mrs. John DeAngelis 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Meals 

Dr. Harry E. Binder 

Dr. Maurice Rosman 

Dr. Andrew DeMasi 



FAMILY 



The Class of 1968 wishes to thank its famihes 
for their generous support of SYNAPSIS 1968. 



Mr. and Mrs. Morris L. Mogilefsky 

Mr. Elijah Yardumian 

Mr. John F. Seibert 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kleiber 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry Hirschorn 

Mrs. Sylvia K. Levin 

Mrs. Edith L. Boyer 

Mr. and Mrs. C.B. Harris 

Col. Francis W. Parke 

Mr. Graham W. Corddry 

Mr. Francis V. Schmelzer 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Polnerow 

Mr. Morris K. Levy 

Rev. and Mrs. E. Talmadge 

Mrs. RoseCiambotti 

Mr. Alfred Poggi 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Gula 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Kalz 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Dubrow 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert F. McCollom 

Dr. and Mrs. Julius Sobel 

Mr. Israel A. Armon 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. McHugh 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley T. Markoski 

Mr. H.A. Schiowitz 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas Mauriello 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacques L. Surer 

Mrs. Paul Noel, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Pankuch 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace J. Ellor 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve X. Gallas 

Mrs. Elizabeth Blount 

Dr. Joseph L. Eshleman 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Loux 

Mr. Max Brandt 

Mr. Earl Ayres 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Edelstein 

Dr. and Mrs. Jos. C. Hatch 



PATRONS 



The Class of 1968 wishes to thank the following Patrons for supporting SYNAPSIS 1968. 



Mr. David Selditch 

Dr. Frederick Anne 

Dr. Bernard F. Broocker 

Dr. James Spiro 

Dr. Jacob Spungin 

Dr. Lawrence B. Greif 

Dr. Justice James 

Dr. David Rothman 

Dr. Robert A. Leopold 

Dr. S.R.Weiss 

Dr. George P. Jaeger 

Dr. W. R. Cavagnaro 

Dr. Herman Caplan 

Dr. Charles L. Liebeknecht 

Dr. David Jaffe 

Dr. Isadore S. Greenberg 

Dr. Theodore C. Loux 

Dr. Merritt G. Davis, Jr. 

Dr. Ned Baron 

Dr. Herbert Lipkin 

Dr. John F. Capista 

Dr. Donald J. Goldman 

Dr. Julian W. Potok 

Dr.C.F. Konell 

Dr. L.F. Eisenhut 

Dr. Henry Salkind 

Dr. Robert G. Bowman 

Dr. Urban I. DiPasquale 

Dr. A.L. Price 

Dr. Alex J. Keller 

Dr. M.C. Pettapiece 

Dr. William L. Bollman 



Dr. K.T. Steigelman 

Dr. Frank F. Zaccardi 

Dr. Albert Grayce 

Dr. William E.Briglia 

Dr. Richard M. Hiestand 

Dr. J. Goldstein 

Dr. Hubert A. Wagner 

Dr. Robert A. Ball 

Dr. Robert A. Renza 

Dr. Leon Adam Kowalski 

Dr. Leonard Johnson 

Dr. William G. McDowell 

Dr. F. Rosdahl 

Dr. Bertha M. Maxwell 

Dr. Irwin Rothman 

Dr. Arthur E. Greene 

Judge J. Sydney Hoffman 

Dr. Elwin C.Hall 

Dr. C lemon Pardales 

Dr. Saul Kanoff 

Dr. Marvin Kanetield 

Dr. John H. Pulker 

Dr. Salvatore R. Vasile 

Dr. Meyer B. Winokur 

Dr. E. Milton Friedman 

Dr. Reuben B. Loeb 

Dr. John E.P.Burns 

Dr. Ralph A. Luongo 

Dr. Alfred \. Green 

Dr. J. Harris Joseph 

Drs. Tabby and Jacobson 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Simmers 




the class of 1968 gratefully acknowledges a job well done 
by its class officers. 

a special thanks goes to marty polnerow, whose most diffi- 
cult and demanding job often seemed to go unnoticed by his 
class. 

we, the class, would like its leaders to know that we appre- 
ciated their excellent efforts at helping to make our four years 
at pcom run more smoothly. 



class officers 

martin polnerow chairman 

donald massey vice-chairman 

fred bear secretary 

marvin lessig treasurer 



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JOHN F. KENNEDY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

STRATFORD, NEW JERSEY 

THE ONLY NON-PROFIT COMMUNITY OSTEOPATHIC 

HOSPITAL 
SERVING SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY 




GRAND RAPIDS 
OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITAL 



OPPORTUNITIES: 


175 beds of busy 


INTERNSHIP 


hospital ofTering 


RESIDENCIES 


abundant experience 


PRACTICE LOCATIONS 


ASK 


STAFF MEMBERSHIP 


OUR 


A FINE PLACE TO LIVE 


GRADUATES 



Robert L. Loelz, Administrator 
h.M. Johnson, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Med. Dir. 
1919 Boston St., S.E., Grand Rapids, 
Michigan 49506 Phone 452-51 51 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to the 

"Megacolon" Class (1968). 



Our sincerest thanks for allowing us 
the privilege of being associated 
with your class. 



Dr. Gerald Scharf 
Dr. A ndrew Pecora 



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Compliments 
of 

PFIZER 
LABORATORIES 



KHHj 




ALLENTOWN 

OSTEOPATHIC 

HOSPITAL 



1736 Hamilton street 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Allentown Osteopathic Hospital, Inc. is a 
non-profit corporation operating general 
hospitals in Allentown (125 beds) and 
Northampton (45 beds). 

A.O.A. approved for Internship training. 

Residencies in Surgery and Radiology. 

The Hospital's Staff of Osteopathic Physi- 
cians includes certified specialists in Sur- 
gery, Obstretrics and Gynecology, Pedia- 
trics, Radiology, Anesthesiology, Proctol- 
ogy, Urology and Neurology. 

DANIEL G. RICHARDI 

Administrator 



COONEY BROTHERS, INC. 

Pipe, Valves, Fittings 
Plumbing& Heating Supplies 

5th & Dauphin streets 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19133 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduating Class of 

1968 



A Friend 





South Bend 
Osteopathic 

South Bend, Indiana 

Approved 

American Osteopathic Assn. 
For the Training of 
Interns and Residents. 



Hospitals Serving 
Michiona Area 



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Buchanan 
Community Hospital 

(Osteopathic) 

Buchanan, Michigan 




BRENTWOOD HOSPITAL 



41 10 Warrensville Center Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 44122 

216-752-2700 



Approved for the teaching of interns and residents 



Hii 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 

1968 GRADUATING CLASS 

OFTHE 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE 



PENNSYLVANIA OSTEOPATHIC 
ASSOCIATION 



RIVERSIDE HOSPITAL 

CLIFTON PARK MANOR 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Approved for Intern and Residency 
Training 

Internship (Rotating) 

Residency (Anesthesiology) 

A new 129 bed hospital 
will be completed In 1968. 




MESA GENERAL HOSPITAL 

OSTEOPATHIC 

515 North Mesa Drive 

Mesa, Arizona 85201 

(602)969-9111 

Approved for Intern Training 

Ultra-modern 70 bed hospital and 
new 84 bed extended care facility. 

Offers many opportunities 

Great potential for general 

and specialty practice 

15 miles from metropolitan Phoenix 
Area in the valley of the sun 



ZAMSKY STUDIOS 

1007 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Negatives of portraits appearing in this annual 

are kept on file. 

Photograplns may be ordered. 



Artist Supplies 



Sporting Goods 



CITY LINE CAMERA CO. 

For anything photographic 
At competitive prices 



7642 City Line Ave. 
GR 70266 



Phila. Pa. 19151 
Open Wed. & Fri. evenings 




SHENANGO VALLEY OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITAL 

2200 Memorial Drive Farrell, Pennsylvania, 16121 

Telephone (Area Code 412) 347-4591 




A new. general, nonprofit hospital erected on 15 acres of land donated by the City of Farrell overlooking the beautiful Shenango Valley. Funds 
for construction and equipment contributed by public minded citizens with assistance from Public Law 72 725. Hill-Burton Hospital Act. 
Opened March 29, 1960. Fully air-conditioned, modern physical plant with 75 beds, 10 bassinets. Emergency room averages 300 cases month- 
ly. Young, progressive, "intern oriented" staff. New physicians welcomed on Staff. Excellent practice locations available in community of 75, 
000 population. Convenient to lakes, mountains, and metropolitan cultural activities. 



A.O.A. Approved Internships 



C.E. Clary, M.H.A., Administrator 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 1968 

PARKVIEW HOSPITAL 

1331 East Wyoming Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19124 



APPROVED FOR INTERN AND RESIDENT TRAINING 





'Of course it hurts, Steve, it's caught in the table." 



PARTNERS IN HEALTH: 

• YOU 

• YOUR DOCTOR 

• YOUR HOSPITAL 

AND 

BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD 

• • • 

BlueCross of Greater Philadelphia 

and 

Pennsylvania Blue Shield 





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TRI-COUNTY HOSPITAL 

An Osteopathic Institution 

Sproul & Thomson Roads 

Springfield, Delaware County, Pa. 19064 



Accredited by A.O.A. for Interns and Residents 




Residencies in General Surgery; Orthopedic Surgery; 
Anesthesiology; Internal Medicine 




^■^p^ 



WE' 

WELCOME 

THE 

CLASS OF 1968 

TO THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE 

OF 

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE 



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BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS of 1968 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm H. Waldron 



TRinity 7-2622 



OPEN FRIDAY EVE. 



FRED PORRECA 

CUSTOM MEN'S TAILOR 



1989 NORTH 63rd STREET 
DIRAN ARSLANIAN PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19151 




""nmnimii iiiiiiiubiiii 



Dedicated to the continued advancement 
of health through drug research 



McNeil laboratories, inc 

Fort Washington, Pa. 
pharmaceutical manufacturers 



McNEIL 




.^^^ 



"Now, I'm telling you . the "Cat" never flunks 
anybody." 



GREETINGS FROM FLORIDA'S 
WEST COAST 

SUN COAST HOSPITAL, 
LARGO 



Fully Accredited and Approved 
for Intern Training 
Bed Capacity: 140 



■V 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to the 

1968 Graduates 

of the 
Philadelphia College 

of 
Osteopathic Medicine 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Nathaniel Richter 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

WILKIE VENDING 
CO. 



CONGRATULATIONS CLASS 
OF 1968 



GRANDVIEW 
HOSPITAL 

DAYTON, OHIO 




"We all live in a yellow submarine, a yellow submar- 
ine, a yellow . , , " 




'Justice, you just ate the specimen! 



THE SAMSON 
LABORATORIES 

1619 SPRUCE STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

REFERRAL LABORATORY SERVICE 

FOR 
PHYSICIANS AND HOSPITALS 



PARKVIEW HOSPITAL 

(OSTEOPATHIC) 

1920 Parkwood Avenue 

Toledo, Ohio 43624 
91 Beds — 10 Bassinets 

A.O.A. approved for Five 
Internships 

Approved for Residencies in Anesthesia, 
Surgery, Radiology, & Orthopedic Surgery 



DEWEY'S 

FAMOUS 

COFFEE SHOPS 

'NO BETTER FOOD AT ANY PRICE' 

48th & Spruce Sts. 



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EiS:smm^aimimmm^^fy 



THE 

INTRAFRATERNITY 

COUNCIL 



EXTENDS BEST WISHES 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1968 

Atlas Club 
iota Tau Sigma 
Lambda Omicron Gamma 
Phi Sigma Gamma 



Phone, DE 4-3816 



COCCO BROS 

Manufacturers of 

Orthopedic and Surgical Appliances 

Artificial Limbs 

1223 S. 15th Street 
Philadelphia 46, Pa. 




"Damn it! I do hear an R on T." 




CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

Graduates of 1968 

Mr. Charles A. Peruto 

and 
Mr. Dominick Vitullo 



PCOM molds men! 



m in j 









1 

1 


COMPLIMENTS 

of 

Mr. Marvin Lessin 

and 

Mr. Donald Manchel 


CONGRATULATIONS 

and 
BEST WISHES 

CLASS of 1968 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rubens 


' 


CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS of 1968 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustine Pelagatti 


CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS of 1968 

Mr. Donald Marshall 


rfS 


CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS of 1968 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Del Collo 


BEST WISHES 
CLASS of 1968 
JACKIE GORDON MEN'S STORE, 
INC. 



CONGRATULATIONS 



AND 



BEST WISHES 



TO THE 



CLASS OF 1968 



FROM THE 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



H«i 




COMPLIMENTS 

of 
David Kanner 
Burton Stein 

Jack E. Feinberg 
Edward Barol 



AComplete Printing Plant 

OFFSET 

LETTERPRESS 

To Serve Your Needs 

Established over 75 years ago 

LYON AND ARMOR, INC. 

147-51 No. 10th St., Philadelphia 
Phone WA 2-0234 



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OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITAL OF MAINE 

335 Brighton Avenue 
Portland, Maine 04102 



Approved for Intern and Residency Training 
Detailed information available on request 

Edward T. Newell, D.O. 
Medical/Educational Director 



BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS of 1968 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Quinn 



CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS of 1968 
Mr. Morris Finkel 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 
Mr. Robert Lucorini 

and 
Mr. Julius Fioravanti 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

Dr. and Mrs. Burton Marks 

and Family 



1 



Professional Liability Insurance 
Serving the profession nationwide 

since 1925 

Endorsed by the AOA since 1934 

Experienced claims handling protects 

the Doctor's professional reputation; 

broad policy provisions, backed by 

millions in assets, protect his 

financial position— present and future 

THE NETTLESHIP 
COMPANY 

1212 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los Angeles 17, California 

Established 1919 




How did you get that camera in here? 



Our Heartiest Congratulations and Best Wisines 
to the CLASS OF 1968 

PROFESSIONAL PLANNING 
ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Bernard I. Waters 

James P. Hill 
Specializing in Personal Service on a planned basis to assure eactn 
client maximum insurance value and lifetime financial planning 
assistance. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



1728 Spruce St. 



KI6-6320 



'as sure as god 







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